EBC, easy as 1-2-3…

This is a story of when I decided to trek to the Base Camp of Mount Everest with eight of my craziest friends. It’s kind of a difficult story to tell because it’s not really what you’d expect, but I’m going to tell it anyway…

I guess the best place to start this story is where my very first story left off – descending from the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. I was sitting in the mess tent during our last night on the mountain, surrounded by my new friends and old ones. As we were all joking and reminiscing about our great adventure together, someone lobbed out the idea of trekking to Everest Base Camp. Two people eagerly jumped on the idea while the remainder of the group went silent. I shuddered at the idea of the frost gnawing at my nose while I squint into the blinding snowstorm, struggling to find our group. I shook this thought away as I leaned into Sieu and whispered “Yeaaaaaaaaaah … that’s a little too hardcore for us…”

Fast forward 18 months later and here I am looking for the gate to Kathmandu in the Istanbul airport. Somewhere in between that moment on the mountain and now, all nine of us impulsively booked this trip, no questions asked, when it went on sale. So, here we are, soon to be reuniting for the first time as old friends at the Moonlight Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal.

The reality of this trip still alludes me. I’m going through the usual motions that I do during all of our travels. I go through security. Roam the airport. Board the plane. Pick out a movie. Fall asleep. Wake up. Leave the plane. And repeat.

As I head towards gate D13, I feel as if I’m walking in slow motion against a blur of cell phones and business suits rushing by me. Everyone looks the same and pulls along that same rectangular carry on suitcase with the long handle and four-tiny wheels struggling to keep up. As I look around to find real signs of life, an image comes into focus. It’s two men, in their late-20’s, standing off to the side. They are casually dressed and are both wearing Osprey backpacks. One of them is bent down tying his hiking boot while they continue to engage in conversation. As I watch him tighten his laces, it’s like something finally clicked. It’s as if I finally woke up from this haze and realized what’s going on. I guess the best way to explain it is like being the last person to understand a joke: … waiiiiiiit a minute …. we are soon going to be in Kathmandu …. which is in Asia … and then we will be hiking for 12 days through the Himalayas to the Base Camp … of Mount Everest! My stomach fluttered with excitement. I walk over to them and lean in, a bit giddy, and say “Let me guess … you’re going to Kathmandu?” They both stop talking and look at me blankly. “Uh.. yeah…” one of them finally replies with a puzzled look on his face. “I can tell by your backpack!!!” I respond quickly, with a big goofy grin, as I point to mine and keep walking. Good job, Sherlock Holmes. I praise myself; however, they don’t seem as impressed with my deductive reasoning.

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As we reach our gate, it’s buzzing with eager travelers waiting to board their plane. I look around and see Osprey backpacks, Merrell hiking boots, and pants, which zip off into shorts! The girls have messy hair and their faces have been kissed by the elements of wind, sun, and cold. They don’t airbrush these flaws but instead, embrace them. Although I’ve never been here before, there’s a sense of familiarity in my surroundings. It’s like I stumbled upon an isolated pocket of misfits hidden in this hectic, polished airport and it’s exactly where I belong. Normally, I don’t always feel like I fit in, but here, I do. I am innately shy, which makes me quite socially awkward and a little bit weird. My social skills are slightly limited by my attention span and my interests are all over the place as a result of that. Here, I look around and see dreamers, explorers, and risk-takers who refuse to conform.

As we wait to board the plane, I begin feeling slightly apprehensive. Leading up to this point, I’ve had a false sense of certainty since my last hike to the summit of Kilimanjaro went so well; however, what exactly was it that made me successful? The training? Proper hydration? Taking Diamox? Or perhaps it was an absolute fluke?! I began realizing that I may not be able to replicate that same experience. This may actually be very challenging. My training and diet have suffered due to the reality of adult responsibilities but also due to the lack of motivation brought on by fear, as I had with Kilimanjaro. I am tired, dehydrated, and have never trekked for this long before. Also, we are only 10 kg of gear, which is 5 kg less than Kilimanjaro, yet the trip is double in length. Did I even choose the right gear to at least stay comfortable? As these questions fill my mind, I realize that it is too late now. In two days, we will begin our trek.

36 hours of transit later. 4 airports. 3 flights. 6 movies. Roughly 5 broken hours of sleep. And we land in Nepal. Let the adventure begin…

HOW TO … Pack For Everest Base Camp!

You’re doing WHAT?!” Expect that reaction as you begin preparing for this adventure of a lifetime.

So, once you’re done questioning if this is a good idea or not (which it is … trust me!), you’ll need to begin planning what kind of gear you’re going to need to invest into. Here’s my guide to everything that you’ll need to stay comfortable (and happy) during your trek to Everest Base Camp.

This item list is solely based on my own research and guided by my own personal experience on what I used during our 12-day trek in September / October with Intrepid Tours. Keep in mind that the time of year in which you’re planning your trek will dictate the type of gear you’ll need – there is no bad weather, just bad gear so you want to be adequately prepared!

PACKING LIST

* = HIGHLY recommended
BAGS

  • 25 L Osprey Manta day bag
    • I have various Osprey backpacks. They are comfortable, adjustable, and most have great ventilation for your back. In my opinion, Osprey also has the comfiest waistbands (with pockets), allowing you to alternate the weight between your hips and shoulders.
    • These packs also come with a Camelbak hydration system.
      • Bring an extra bite valve, just in case!
  • * 75 L Marmot Long Hauler Duffel Bag *
    • I also have a 95 L North Face duffel bag – both are equally amazing!
    • This bag is versatile, durable, & waterproof!
    • Although it’s a bit heavier than some duffels, I would HIGHLY recommend it!
    • Since our maximum weight allotment was 10 kg, this bag was the ideal size for me during this trip. It fit all of my gear & sleeping bag perfectly.


HEADWEAR

  • * Buff *
    • Good for dust and also to prevent sunburns on the back of your neck.
    • Light, versatile … and looks cool!
  • Tilley Hat
  • Wool Toque
  • Sunglasses
    • I bought mountaineering glasses but just used my regular sunglasses (which were fine).
  • Earplugs
    • The tea houses can be quite noisy so these are very handy!


UPPER BODY

  • T-shirts x 4
    • Preferably merino wool – it’s breathable, soft, warm, and (most importantly) odor-resistant!
  • Long sleeve shirt
    • Icebreaker
  • Thermal top
    • Luckily, I didn’t need this.
  • Fleece top
  • Sweater
    • Columbia Omni-Heat
    • Used almost daily – love this product!
  • Rain Jacket
    • I used a standard Outdoor Research rain jacket, which was sprayed with silicone for extra rain repellent. It also doubled as a wind-breaker; however, it’s not as breathable as an actual shell.
  • Poncho
    • * Sea to Summit Ultra Sil Nano Poncho *
      • This is a great product which is ultralight & very compressible.
      • I stopped bringing a day bag cover and just used my poncho (if needed).
  • Insulated Jacket
    • Arc’teryx Beta SL Hybrid Jacket
      • A great overall jacket in the wind, rain, or snow. Comfortable, breathable, & warm. High neck for added warmth (didn’t need a scarf).
  • * Down Jacket *
    • I used Mountain Hard Wear but I would highly recommend ANY brand for a down jacket! It’s compressible & warm.
    • Worn daily.


HANDS

  • Thin gloves
    • Used often during the chilly mornings or evenings.
  • Insulated mittens
    • Never needed.


LOWER BODY

  • Thermal bottoms x 2
    • Used one pair solely for sleeping.
  • Fleece bottoms
    • Luckily, didn’t need them.
  • Hiking pants x 2
    • One is a prAna pair that zip off into shorts (my favorite!).
    • Other is a breathable and stretchy Arc’teryx pair.
  • Yoga Pants
    • Worn around the tea houses.
  • Rain pants
    • I used this both as wind and rain pants.
    • Also sprayed with silicone.
  • Gaiters
    • Louis Garneau
    • These are the only gaiters that I’ve ever used but they are durable, waterproof, and don’t slip.
    • Not needed during this trek.


FOOTWEAR

  • Hiking Shoes
    • The ongoing debate between hiking shoes vs. boots – I was very happy with my choice of shoes but I did see many trekkers favoring hiking boots. It really comes down to personal preference.
    • Find a brand that works for you and stick with it! My go-to is Salomon so I went with the Redwood 2 hiking shoe.
    • Bring an extra pair of insoles in case your shoes get wet.
  • * Crocs *
    • I never thought I would say this but, for me, this is a camping must!
    • Used around the tea houses; convenient, easy to slip on & lightweight.
  • Socks x 6
    • I love the Darn Tough or Smartwool brand.
    • I also brought a pair of Gortex socks since my shoes are not waterproof.


MISCELLANEOUS

  • Cell Phone
    • If you are willing to pay, most of the tea houses have wifi and charging stations.
    • Charger.
  • External battery
    • Great for recharging your electronics.
    • Downside though – it’s heavy!
  • GoPro
    • Charger.
    • Extra batteries.
  • Travel Notebook
    • Your days will blur together so this is great of keeping notes, such as your daily saturation levels, how you feel, exchange contact info, etc.
  • * Compression Sacks *
    • I used mine to divide my clothes (tops, bottoms, socks).
  • Hiking poles
    • Black Diamond Distance Carbon FLZ Poles
    • These are ultralight & foldable.
    • I normally don’t hike with poles so I never used them but there are sections of the trail where they are very useful.
  • Gatorade Powder
    • Responsible tourism – you can buy water but it does create a lot of waste on the mountain; therefore, it’s recommended to use tap water and just purify your water. We used a steri-pen with additional chlorine tabs.
    • I prefer Gatorade to mask the taste of chlorine & replenish electrolytes.
  • Hot Paws
    • Never needed.
  • * Nalgene bottle *
    • HIGHLY recommended! At higher altitudes, I would put hot water in it to warm up my sleeping bag. With the screw-on top, you don’t have to worry about leaks.
    • This was also handy for sterilizing my water and then dumping it into my Camelbak.
  • Lock for duffel bag
  • Money
    • At the tea houses and along the trail, it’s preferred to use Nepalese Rupees.
    • Also for tipping porters & guides during the last night on the mountain – trust me, they deserve a good tip! You can tip in any currency but Rupees is easiest for them.
  • Tenacious Tape
  • Chlorine Tablets / Water Purification


SLEEPING GEAR

  • Therma Rest Oberon -18C Sleeping Bag
  • Inflatable pillow
    • Not needed. Rooms have a pillow and comforter.
  • Sleeping clothes
    • I brought an extra set of clothes just for sleeping. It was nice having something clean.
    • I also brought a onesie, if you noticed in my picture. Totally useless item but it was funny.


PERSONAL HYGIENE

  • Dry shampoo
  • Regular shampoo
    • If you want to pay, you can have access to a hot shower at some of the tea houses.
  • Hairbrush with extra hair elastics
  • Bar of soap
  • Baby wipes
  • Small travel towel
  • Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste
  • Face cream
  • Baby powder
    • An awesome luxury item! I put this stuff everywhere!!!
  • Toilet paper ++
    • Optional: Kleenex
    • It can also be purchased along the way.
  • Lip balm
  • Eye drops
  • Hand sanitizer + +
  • Drier sheets
    • Stuff these in your bag to keep it smelling fresh.
  • Vaseline
    • I didn’t bring this but wish I had some for at night. The air is SO dry that your lips become chapped and your nose may also become raw from blowing it so much.


EDIBLES

  • Gum
  • Lozenges
  • Instant Coffee
    • You can buy tea or coffee at all of the tea houses.
    • I enjoy the Nescafe sachets so I would just order hot water and use these instead.


MEDICATIONS / FIRST AID

  • Advil
    • You will likely get a headache from the altitude.
    • It can also be used for muscle aches and pains. 12 days of trekking can be quite strenuous.
  • Diamox
    • Use at your discretion. We used it.
  • Melatonin
    • Helpful for combating jet lag.
  • Gravol
  • Imodium
  • Nasal Spray
    • I didn’t bring any but wish I had – a few of us spent a few days quite congested.
  • Dexamethason tablets
    • Just in case!
  • Broad-spectrum antibiotics
    • This was a lifesaver for a few members of our group!
  • Sunscreen + +
  • Mole Skin (blisters)
  • Physio tape

Traveling on a budget? Check out http://www.thelasthunt.com for some great deals!

Still have questions or concerns? I’d love to help! Send me a message!

Happy Travels!